Category Archives: Job Hunt

Fat People Aren’t Good Workers.

I don’t really believe that fat people aren’t good workers.  In fact, I am a fat people (or at least I used to be) and I happen to think that I am a good worker.  There are a lot of people who do believe this, though.  I believe that this is just fuzzy thinking.

fat people are discriminated against

A lecturer at NYU recently tweeted “Dear obese PhD applicants: If you don’t have the willpower to stop eating carbs, you won’t have the willpower to do a dissertation. #truth.”  More fuzzy thinking:

fuzzy thinking re obesity

What does will power re: food have to do with willpower over anything else?  Why don’t people who don’t have willpower re: other things–alcohol, sex, spending, gambling, exercise, hoarding–fall into this guys criticism.  This guy is an evolutionary psychologist–a scientist–who should have more discipline in his thinking.

He’s not the only one.  Recruiters (I once had a recruiter proudly tell me that he made overweight candidates walk up four flights of steps to interviews and if they couldn’t do it, they didn’t get to the next level.  Why?  Is walking up stairs a job requirement?  If he doesn’t do that for normal weight people, then how does he know that they can (if it is a requirement of getting to the next level?), hiring managers, supervisors, co-workers, sales people, customers all make decisions about people based on their weight.  Is it relevant?  Sometimes.  More often not.

Prejudice against fat people is an acceptable prejudice.  It is close to the last acceptable prejudice.  If you find yourself being prejudice against overweight people, challenge your thinking.  Examine what you believe about fat people, thought by thought by thought.  Do they really support one another?

fat lazy fuzzy thinkingDo you just not like fat people?  Do you just think that fat people should do better/be better/act better?  Is this a big enough deal that they should not get a job or a promotion?  Do you believe that being fat is an indicator of someone’s character?  There is a recent study that shows that children as young as four are prejudiced.

OK, So I Think This Discrimination Is Wrong

But it is not illegal.  It is hard to prove (and a lot of people think it is justified).  So . . . if you are overweight, this is something that you can actually do to affect your employability and promotability.  It might have as much of an impact (or more) as getting more education, or more experience, or even more networking.

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Filed under Diversity, Job Hunt, New Job, Personal Change

Are They Discriminating Against You? Probably.

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Discrimination

Not only is it likely that someone (or several someones) are discriminating against you, it is also likely that you are discriminating against someone (or several someones).  It is human nature that we like/trust/believe in/select those who are like us more than those who are different from us.  So . . . Europeans choose Europeans, Americans choose Americans, young people choose young people.  Then there is the problem of stereotypes.  We believe them–without even being aware of them for the most part.  We believe that ‘old’ people aren’t as capable as people our age. We believe that young people aren’t ambitious (at least the latest generation).  Asian people are smart at math.  Women aren’t ambitious because they’re going to go have babies. White men are more ambitious than black men.  And on and on and on.  These stereotypes cause us to discriminate, sometimes without our even being aware of it.  Stereotypes are as  wrong as they are right.  In fact, those of us who are the subject of the stereotypes usually believe they are wrong–period.  I say all of this to acknowledge that discrimination is alive and well in all of our behaviors.   I’m not in any way defending it, just acknowledging it.

So what?

There are laws against discrimination.  There are rules against discrimination.  There are lots of reasons for all of us to struggle against discrimination by others and ourselves.  There are people whose whole existence is focused on the struggle against discrimination.

Can you wait?  Can you wait until everyone stops discriminating against you?  I can’t.  I think it’s time to take the battle on directly.  I think it’s time to work around/through/over and under discrimination.  Just because the decision makers at your organization think you are too old or too young, that doesn’t mean that that is the case at other organizations.  You have a responsibility to yourself to find a place to work that values you for who you are and what you bring to the table.  You need to find a way to make a living that values who and what  you are.

I talk to people who are absolutely sure that they are being discriminated against.  That makes them feel like there is nothing that they can do about it.  They are the age they are.  They are born black or Hispanic or Asian or female, and nothing can change that. True.  There are places, organizations, friends, decision makers, and opportunities where it doesn’t matter.  Go find them.  You are not sentenced to the status quo.  You choose it.

Do something different.

You are not stuck.  When you graduated from high school you didn’t think about this the way you do now (unless, of course, you just graduated from high school).  Life and your experiences have made you believe that people are discriminating against you.  Wipe all that experience off your radar and ASSUME that someone out there can and will believe in you and what you can do.  Go FIND them!  Where are they?  Make people prove that they don’t believe in you instead of assuming that they don’t.  To be clear, I’m not saying they AREN’T discriminating.  I’m saying, don’t let that rule your life.  Go work someplace else.  Go work for a different boss.  Find a way to make a living (including working for yourself) that doesn’t let those who discriminate against you prevent you from doing/being/having what you deserve.  I know that it might be hard.  I know that it would be a lot easier for all of us if discrimination wasn’t a factor.  Don’t let it prevent you from living your life, making a living, being successful.

And then focus on your own discriminatory behavior.

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Filed under Derailment, Diversity, Executive Development, Inclusion, Job Hunt, New Job

The Art of Networking

Network Now, Before You Need To

LinkedIn sent out a lot of emails this week, notifying people that they were in the top 10%, 5%, 1% most viewed profiles.  LinkedIn probably did that to pump up their own volume, but you should take it as an inspiration to pump up the volume of your networking.  Networking is a lot like weight loss (although not as hard).  It is best done slowly, over a long time, with an eye toward your career goal.  Networking doesn’t work well when you need to have a full-blown network in the next week (like getting into that dress your really want to wear to this weekend’s wedding–that is 2 sizes too small).  I work with people who find themselves out of a job, or reorganized to a boss they can’t stand and they suddenly realize that their network is old and cold.  Whereas people who find themselves in the same situation with a robust, active and varied network find jobs and opportunities MUCH faster.

Just for fun, look at your network on LinkedIn.  Go to http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com/ and create a map of your network.  LinkedIn lets you label the parts of your network according to professional groups–former job #1, professional group #1, school, etc.   Look at your network map.  If you needed a new job in the next six months, do you have contacts in the kinds of areas that would help?  Here’s mine:

linkedin map 2.12.13

If you want to develop new skills or get a mentor–can you use your network to do it?  When was the last time that you talked to most of the people in your network?  This year?  In the last five years?  LinkedIn, Facebook and Google+ provide you with easy and helpful tools to connect to people without much heavy lifting. 

In LinkedIn, comment on posts in your groups (and get some groups if you don’t have any).  Send a congratulatory message to people who get promotions.  Respond to people’s blogs.  Reach out with an offer to make connections for people when you notice that they start following a company where you know someone. Endorse people.  Recommend people.

In Facebook, keep up with birthdays and let people know when you enjoy their posts.  Like your friends’ business pages.

In Google+, comment on people’s posts, create circles, join, join, join.

Join Professional Groups.  Think about where the next career opportunities are for you.  Are you a project manager?  Who knows of the project management positions as they open up?  People who belong to PMI.  Join and participate. Do you want to start a business?  Where do the entrepreneurs go to get together?  Find the groups who can open doors for you.

Volunteer.  One of the best ways to get known and to get to know others is to volunteer.  Most nonprofits have significant players in your community on their boards.  Organizations who need your skills usually have people in them who can help you.

Be seen as an expert.  We are lucky to live in a time when we can be seen as an expert through participation in virtual activities.  You can write, join, comment, help and over time be seen as an expert.  When you think of who you admire and who you think of as an expert and thought leader in your field, chances are you don’t ‘know’ that person from an in-person relationship.  You know that person through his/her writing, speaking, participation in activities that you are also a participant.

Excuses.  Whatever excuse you’re giving me as you read this, it doesn’t stack up at all to not having a good network when you need one.  Do JUST ONE THING a week to improve your network.  At the end of a year you will have a network you can use to improve your career–without having to work very hard.  The last thing you want to do when you need your network is to start from (almost) scratch.

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Filed under Job Hunt, Networking, Uncategorized

Are You Too Old To Get a (New) Job?

iStock_000016076327XSmallHow Old Is Old? 

Lately the theme of being too old has continued to pop up in my coaching practice like a Whack-A- Mole game on steroids.  The ironic thing is that the people who have brought it up have ranged from 39 to 60.  These people are not making this up out of whole cloth.  They are getting a signal from something or someone that they are too old to do the job they want to do.  Is there an age that is too old for a job?  Of course there is.  Ninety years old is (probably) too old to do the Tour de France.  So . . . there is probably an age that is too old to do some kinds of physical jobs.  How about mental jobs?  I personally doubt it.  There are people who are as mentally agile in their nineties as some 25 year olds.  I am not saying that all 90 year olds are, but there are some.  And there are some 90 year olds that would be better employees than some 25 year olds.  There aren’t many 90 year olds out there looking for jobs, so let’s talk about my 30-60 year olds who are being put aside because they are “too old.”

Let’s start with what is going on in the job seeker’s head.  Are there other reasons that they aren’t getting the job that they are attributing to being too old.  In other words, is the “too old” thought in the job seeker’s head rather than in the recruiter’s head?  Maybe.  When you don’t get a job and you are looking for a reason, sometimes you attribute it to your own greatest concern–in this case, being too old.  In other cases, not being pretty enough, or being too tall, or not being an extrovert, or not being smart enough.  In other words, maybe you are self-sabotaging by attributing your failure to get the job as being something about yourself that you can’t change.  What about if it was because you didn’t come across in the interview well (you talked too much, or you didn’t make eye contact).  What about if it was something on your resume–in one case in my recent experience a typo!–or the lack of the kind of experience they are looking for.  Or, what if, as in most cases these days, the resume just never got in front of the right eyes?  Your resume was the 583rd resume that came in when they stopped looking at 30?  SO, examine your own mindset and make sure you aren’t attributing it to age, when it is something altogether different.

It is about age, sometimes, though.  People (recruiters, hiring managers, and even you) have stereotypes and prejudices about age that stop you at the door.  Understandingstereotypes a little can help to counter it bit.

Stereotypes

Let’s look at common stereotypes about aging:

  • Older people are more set in their ways
  • Older people’s thinking ability deteriorates
  • Older people’s physical ability deteriorates
  • Older people don’t make good decisions
  • Older people can’t learn, especially technology
  • Older people can’t remember things

So why would anyone want to hire someone for a job who is set in their ways, can’t think, can’t do physical work, can’t make good decisions, can’t learn and can’t remember things?  No one would.  The problem is, these things are not true about ALL old people. In fact, they aren’t true about MOST old people.  (And remember, some of these “too old” people we’re talking about aren’t even 40 yet.)  In some businesses, especially those high tech, start-up kinds of businesses, twenty somethings are preferred to those older than that.

Stereotypes exist because there are some truths to them.  Some old people are set in their ways (as are some young people–ever met a rebellious 16 year old?) Some older people–even as young as late forties–have dementia.  While I am actually stronger and in better shape than I was in my thirties, there are “old” people who have let themselves deteriorate physically.  (Not to say that I’m OLD, but I am over 39)  And then there are those who haven’t kept up with the technology (although if I need my computer fixed, I call on my 80 something father–or my 21-year-old nephew, and frequently they consult).  The tough thing about stereotypes is that they are not reasoned, rational thoughts.  They are automated, instant conclusions that we frequently don’t even know that we have.  That makes them very hard to refute.  When someone who is recruiting for a job takes one look at your resume, looks at your years of experience, the year you graduated from school, the year of your graduate degree, she automatically concludes you are too old for the job because her auto-thoughts go to all the stereotypes listed above.  She can’t even stop herself from dong that.  It gets worse if the person she is hiring for has told her (illegally, I might add) that he doesn’t want anyone over 30 or 40 or 50.  Now she’s got instructions to validate her stereotypes.

Stereotypes Don’t Apply To You

These things don’t apply to you, you say.  You feel, think, act, deliver the same way that you did 20 years ago.  Yeah, that’s the frustrating thing about this.  When a “wrong” stereotype applies to you, reality isn’t a sufficient defense.  Because stereotypes are based on facts.  They are based on generalized assumptions.  So what do you do?  First of all, you MAKE SURE that the stereotypes don’t apply to you.  Make sure you are up to date in all the latest theories, research, tools, and current news in your field.  Make sure that you are current in all the technology.  You don’t text, you say, because it is expensive, or dangerous, or whatever.  Most big companies these days have a texting-IM’ing ability for their employees for in-house communication.  You better learn.  You don’t do Excel, or Publisher, or Access because you never needed it.  You need it now.  Learn it.  You don’t do webex or Telepresence or GoToMeeting.  Then you can’t meet with a huge contingent of workers in almost any company these days.  Learn it.  You cannot stop paying attention to and learning technology tools.  If you do, then they’re right.  Get yourself and keep yourself in shape.  I heard a recruiter say that he walked people up the stairs and if they were huffing and puffing at the top, then they didn’t get the job.  Fair?  No.  Legal–not sure–depends on the job maybe.  Real?  Yes.

Once you make sure that indeed, none of this applies to you, then you need to counteract it in the recruiter/hiring manager’s head.

  • Get past the resume screen.  You need to have at least 10 years experience (if you have it) on your resume.  After that, make a calculation about whether  the older experience is relevant?  Can you say, “more than ten years experience?” Is there a logical break short of going back to when you dipped ice cream at Baskin Robbins?  Address the relevant experience necessary for the job, but consider taking some of it off your resume.  I know, I know, you are more valuable because of that experience.  Prove that to them in the interview, or on the job.  Don’t get cut at the resume stage.  Same is true for the year you graduated from college.  Is the information that is important that you graduated, or the year that you graduated.
  • Get them to see you as a person, as opposed to an (too) old person.  The one thing that helps overcome stereotypes is for people to come to see you as not a fit with the stereotypes.  We all do this.  We don’t necessarily admit to anyone that we do it, but once we see a person as “one of us”–co-worker, friend, leader–as opposed to as “one of them,” we stop thinking that the stereotypes apply.   Do this in the phone screen.  Do this in the interview.  Do it in any interaction you have with the recruiter or the hiring manager.  Do it with interactions with co-workers.  Is it fair that you have to do this?  No.  Is it effective?  Yes.
  • When you encounter a recruiter/hiring manager who is probing your resume/experiences trying to prove/apply the stereotypes, challenge them.  Yes, I said challenge them.  You don’t have anything to lose.  If they are trying to figure out your age, then they hold those stereotypes.  They aren’t allowed to ask how old you are, so they’ll ask what year you graduated from college.  Or they’ll ask whether something was your ‘first’ job with this company.  They’re going to go where they’re going to go. If you ask them if they are trying to figure out how old you are, then you make it a little better for the rest of us who come after.  You probably won’t get the job, but you probably weren’t going to get it anyway.  You can ask them why they think age is relevant for this job. Are there some parts of the job that are specific to younger people.  Again, let me be clear–this will not help you get the job.  It will make their stereotype-thinking more conscious and it might make a difference in changing the way they think–for those who come after.

Get The Stereotypes Out Of Your Own Head

When you don’t get a job, do not automatically assume it is because of the way you are (age, health, credentials).  Of course it may be.  But it is more likely to be about the fact that your resume never got to where it needed to get–it didn’t make it past the computer screen, never got to the top of the pile, etc.  The way you think about it is critical to your ability to get up and keep going.  Erase the stereotypes from your own head.  Assume other decision points.  Keep going.

Best Way To Find A Job, Stereotypes Or Not.

NetworkingHidden Job Market.  Stereotypes are much less a factor when you do it this way.

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Recruiters Are Prejudiced

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Recruiters Are People

I know lots of recruiters.  I like lots of recruiters. In fact, maybe I like all the recruiters I know.  Recruiters are regular people.  And like regular people (yes, that means you too), recruiters are prejudiced.  We are all prejudiced.  We don’t necessarily know that we’re prejudiced.  We don’t think or believe that we’re prejudiced, but all humans are.  If this were a geometry problem, I would have just proved that recruiters are prejudiced, because recruiters are people and people are prejudiced.

If recruiters are prejudiced, then why should you care?  You should care because if you’re looking for a job, it has an impact on you. If the recruiter believes negative or positive things about people ‘like’ you–young, old, fat, African-American, Asian, Southern, Republican, Catholic–then it can affect whether they pass you along for a job. Worse, recruiters are frequently under instructions from someone with a different set of prejudices–maybe about education, skills or particular schools.  So you’re up against (or supported by) layered prejudices.

What Can You Do About It?

First of all don’t waste your energy railing against it.  I’m not saying it isn’t wrong or unfair, but sitting around complaining about it is not going to do any good.  Recognize it as a problem that you have to figure out how to overcome.  Just the same as if you need a certification to get a particular job or  you need to know how to use Access.  You HAVE to address it or look for other jobs with other recruiters.  How do you address it?

  • Don’t get paranoid.  I know, I know.  I just told you that recruiters’ prejudices may be keeping you from getting passed along for a job.  But look at it as a matter to be dealt with.  Be strategic.  Don’t take it personally.
  • Understand what may be triggering the prejudice.  Is it your age?  Are you ‘too’ young?  ‘Too’ old.  How can the recruiter see this?  Does your resume tell it?  How can you make it less obvious?  Take the dates off your education.  Leave/put as much work experience on as is necessary for the job.  Show adequate depth of experience, but don’t go overboard.  Don’t put personal things that aren’t necessary and that might be a hook for prejudice (sewing, cooking, gaming, sports).
  • Use the words that the recruiter used in the job description in your resume.  Mirror the job description as much as you can.  A lot of time and effort went into creating that job description.  The words mean something to the person who wrote it.  Use the words to describe your qualifications.
  • Check out your image.  Minimize the prejudice triggers to the extent that you can–dress older or younger, remove the multiple piercings, cover the tattoos, dye your hair, lose weight, dress professionally, stylishly.  (I can hear you objecting through the electrons that separate us.  I am not telling you to not be who you are.  I’m telling you to do things that get you around the things that are in your way.  I’ll bet big bucks that you dress differently when you go to church or to school or to work or camping. Put the foot forward that will help clear roadblocks out of the way.)
  • Form a relationship with the recruiter. Keep working at the relationship.   Humans think in terms of ‘them’ and ‘us.’  Humans like ‘us’ better.  People who we know and like become ‘us,’ even when the new ‘us’ has traits we are prejudiced against.  In other words, if I’m prejudiced against people ‘like’ you, but I like you, I think you are different and I’m not prejudiced against YOU, just those others.  I KNOW that sounds crazy, but go read some psychology research–you’ll find that this craziness is supported by the research.
  • Don’t ever give in and believe these prejudices.  Just because you are young or old or less educated, doesn’t mean that you aren’t capable.

Once You Have The Job

Examine your own hiring prejudices.  You have them.  Challenge yourself, remembering your recent experiences, to act against those prejudices and to hire people based on their individual abilities, not on stereotypes (even if stereotypes  are faster, as George Clooney said in “Up In The Air”).

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Filed under Career Development, Communication, Diversity, Job Hunt, New Job, Recruiters

Just a Paycheck

Just a Paycheck

Just a Paycheck”

If the reason that you’re working at the job that you have is for “just a paycheck,” you’re wasting your time and maybe your life.  I’m not talking about people who are working at a job to fund the things that they like to do, or their family, or the things that are important to them.  I’m talking about the people who really see that they are just working for the money.  I’ve been told this by lots of people.  It’s all I can do not to  get on my high horse when someone says it to me.  If you’re only working ‘for the paycheck’ that radiates from you.  You have no energy.  You have no enthusiasm for the tasks of the job, or even for your co-workers. You aren’t looking for a better way to do things; you’re just doing the bare minimum of what it takes.  It is highly likely that you’ll be among the first to go in a layoff, just because it is easy to put someone on a list who clearly isn’t having fun and who isn’t doing anything extra.

NO, you say.  It doesn’t show.  You’re doing the job; you’re just not enjoying it.  Ask yourself if that is true.  Look around.  Are you seeking to do better?  Are you taking on more without it being foisted on you?  Probably not.  And you probably aren’t taking on more because you don’t have the energy for it.  When you frame your experience in such a negative way, you don’t have energy.  You resent being there.  It’s all you can do to get to the end of the day, and it’s really hard to get there in the morning. 

Reframe!

I’m not saying that your job is fun.  It probably isn’t.  Your boss may be terrible.  Your co-workers may not be worthy of your time.  So what?  Find something that is worth being there for.  It could be as simple as reframing your experience to being about what your paycheck lets you do outside of the job.  It could be what you’re learning from this experience.  Or how it fits into your career path goals.  Or that you are LUCKY to have a job in these tough times.  REFRAME the way you think about it.

If you are able to reframe, it is likely that you will suddenly find that you have more energy.  You may have enough energy to look around the organization for a better job, or a better boss.  You may have the energy to figure out what you really want to do long term.  You may have enough energy to figure out how to get another stream of revenue that will enable you to find another job/career/hobby that will make you happy(ier).

Get A New Job!

If you can’t reframe,  GO FIND ANOTHER JOB—before someone forces you to.  I work with so many people who would be glad to have their old job back—somehow they can see a lot of value/interest/fun in it now that someone has decided they are out.  Find a job that you can do for other reasons than a paycheck.  Find a job that you can/will be good at and that will help you feel better about yourself.

LIFE IS TOO SHORT to work for ‘just a paycheck!’

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Filed under Career Goals, Derailment, Executive Development, Job Hunt, Recession Proof, Reframe

Fed Up With Looking For a Job?

Fed Up With Looking For A Job?

Have you been looking for a job for a while?  Have you sent out dozens of resumés and heard NOTHING back?  Have you talked to recruiters who told you that you weren’t qualified even though you had way more education, but you didn’t have an obscure certification that was listed in the job description?  Have you had one conversation with a recruiter or a company HR person who said they’d get right back to you and then NOTHING?  Are you getting mad about it?  Are you feeling discouraged?  Are you beginning to think that you’ll never find anything?

fed up with looking for a job?

All of the above?

The bad news —  you are not alone.  In fact, there are thousands and thousands and thousands and thousands of others.  The good news–there are ways to crack the code of this.  The most important thing is to keep a positive attitude. The hardest thing, and most important,  is keeping up your energy, your determination and your commitment.  The hardest part is to ignore all the ‘NOTHING’s and treat each new attempt as if it is the first one.  It is hard, also, to keep learning from the negative experiences, while you keep approaching each application with as much optimism and energy as you did the first one.

The things that you tell yourself when you get discouraged–that YOU’LL never find something, that there is something wrong with YOU, that it’s hopeless–ARE NOT TRUE.

We have a very difficult confluence of a lot of things happening at once that are making this worse:

  • companies are not hiring
  • recruiters are able to find enough people without being mindful about how they treat people (and I’m really being diplomatic about that!)
  • companies use software to ‘weed’ out resumes that don’t have all the keywords–even when the keywords aren’t relevant
  • older people are not leaving the workforce because their retirement funds evaporated
  • so many jobs are moving around the globe
  • etc., etc., etc.

And so it’s easy not to be optimistic.  I get it.  It’s hard to keep trying.  It’s not fun.  It’s SO frustrating when you hear nothing back.  It’s SO frustrating when you find a job that is just right for you and you apply and NOTHING.  Even though there are people who find a job quickly, most don’t.  Almost everyone gets discouraged before they hit pay dirt.  The lucky ones, though, can get past being discouraged.

You have to figure out how to keep your energy, commitment, optimism, and determination up.  That is way more important than making sure your resumé is perfect.  Because if you have your optimism and your energy, then you can fix your resume over and over.  You can keep getting yourself out there to network. You can ignore how much you hate working with recruiters because of the stupid things they say and talk to THIS one as if she’ll be different.

How Do You Do That?

  • Find someone (or a few someones) to talk to.  You need someone who can pump you up on a regular basis.  When you talk to yourself in the vacuum of your own thoughts, you are not as objective as you need to be.  There are techniques that you need to use to find a job, and you need someone to remind you when you lose sight of them.  There are lessons, strategies and tactics to finding a job and you need to be reminded of them regularly.
  • Remember that the number of rejections that you get is irrelevant–the number of acceptances is what is important.  In order to get acceptances, you have to crack the code.  In order to crack the code, you have to keep learning and refining your tactics.  In order to do that, you have to keep applying.  In order to do that, you have to keep your energy and determination up.
  • Network.  Socializing (even for you introverts) helps you have a different perspective.  It gets you out of your head.  If you’re going to socialize, you might as well network.  I don’t mean going out to a networking event.  I mean going to a social event, or spending some time online on a social networking site, reconnecting/connecting and finding out what people are doing.  And telling people that you’re looking for a job.  And telling people what kind of a job you’re looking for.  And asking people if they know anyone they think would be good for you to approach for an informational interview.
  • Don’t take it personally.  Hard, I know.  It isn’t personal, though.  Chances are really good that your resumé never got in front of anyone who could make a decision about it.   Chances are that the selection software looking for keywords weeded you out, or the recruiter (who rarely understands the industry, company, job or requirements thoroughly) weeded you out, or your resume was #402 and they cut off at #400.  Any of those things are not about you.  You still have to surmount them, though.  You just shouldn’t take it personally, because it isn’t.
  • Think about it like a puzzle.  Is it the resumé?  Is it the cover letter?  Is it that you need to hit it as soon as the job is posted–yes, at 4:14 am?  Is it that you need to find someone in the company?  Is it that need to follow up better?  Keep trying things until you crack the code.

Some Good Books That Might Help:

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Filed under Books, Career Development, Career Goals, Executive Development, Goal Setting, Job Hunt, Recession Proof